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Communities respond to COVID-19

As communities around the Golden Triangle encouraged social distancing, nearly every aspect of life has been affected. People working in different sectors have responded in their own way.

 


 

The main entrance of Oktibbeha County Hospital is closed Thursday in Starkville, Mississippi. The hospital is limiting visitors for patients and screening every person who enters the hospital for illness. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

The main entrance of Oktibbeha County Hospital is closed Thursday in Starkville, Mississippi. The hospital is limiting visitors for patients and screening every person who enters the hospital for illness.

 

Gloria Larry takes Edmond McDavis' temperature Thursday as a part of a screening each visitor to Oktibbeha County Hospital must go through in order to enter the facility. Visitors were also asked about any symptoms they may be experiencing and if they had traveled recently. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Gloria Larry takes Edmond McDavis' temperature Thursday as a part of a screening each visitor to Oktibbeha County Hospital must go through in order to enter the facility. Visitors were also asked about any symptoms they may be experiencing and if they had traveled recently.

 

Supplies to screen visitors as they enter Oktibbeha County Hospital were placed on a table inside the doors of the hospital Thursday in Starkville. Two staff members were sitting behind the table to conduct screenings. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Supplies to screen visitors as they enter Oktibbeha County Hospital were placed on a table inside the doors of the hospital Thursday in Starkville. Two staff members were sitting behind the table to conduct screenings.

 

Columbus Police Chief Fred Shelton and Sergeant Louis Alexander cruise around shortly after the 10 p.m. curfew Saturday in Columbus. The 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. general curfew, with the exception of essential travel for those over 18 years old, was passed by Columbus City Council members to prevent further spread of COVID-19. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Columbus Police Chief Fred Shelton and Sergeant Louis Alexander cruise around shortly after the 10 p.m. curfew Saturday in Columbus. The 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. general curfew, with the exception of essential travel for those over 18 years old, was passed by Columbus City Council members to prevent further spread of COVID-19.

 

Columbus City Councilman Ethel Stewart waits for the mayor to address council members regarding his proposed resolution in response to the COVID-19 pandemic Saturday at City Hall. Council members voted to implement the resolution that restricts gathering sizes to 10 people, requires restaurants to switch to carry-out only orders and sets a general curfew. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Columbus City Councilman Ethel Stewart waits for the mayor to address council members regarding his proposed resolution in response to the COVID-19 pandemic Saturday at City Hall. Council members voted to implement the resolution that restricts gathering sizes to 10 people, requires restaurants to switch to carry-out only orders and sets a general curfew.

 

The meat shelves at many grocery stores have been scarce as residents stock up on food and paper products in case they will be unable to leave their homes. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

The meat shelves at many grocery stores have been scarce as residents stock up on food and paper products in case they will be unable to leave their homes.

 

Carlos Kemp hands a sack lunch to Kolten Robinson, 1, Aubrey Hendrix, 5, Madison Drake, 7, and Zackery Tice, 11, as Steve Denson exits the bus with an additional few lunches Friday in Starkville.

Carlos Kemp hands a sack lunch to Kolten Robinson, 1, Aubrey Hendrix, 5, Madison Drake, 7, and Zackery Tice, 11, as Steve Denson exits the bus with an additional few lunches Friday in Starkville. "I love these kids. Our community needs it (help). Hopefully if I get down somebody will help me out," Denson said.

 

From left, Eddie Marroquin, Matthew Marroquin, 2, Vihaan Sankar, 5, and Kylan Tallie, 7, run to the school bus to grab a lunch from Carlos Kemp on Sunday in Starkville. Armstrong Middle School distributed 225 lunches to students Friday. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The program is funded by the Summer Food Service Program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

From left, Eddie Marroquin, Matthew Marroquin, 2, Vihaan Sankar, 5, and Kylan Tallie, 7, run to the school bus to grab a lunch from Carlos Kemp on Sunday in Starkville. Armstrong Middle School distributed 225 lunches to students Friday. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The program is funded by the Summer Food Service Program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services.

 

Armstrong Middle School distributed meals to its students on Friday in Starkville. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Armstrong Middle School distributed meals to its students on Friday in Starkville. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

 

Carlos Kemp walks back to the school bus to grab empty cardboard boxers used to transport sack lunches to school age kids on Friday in Starkville. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Carlos Kemp walks back to the school bus to grab empty cardboard boxers used to transport sack lunches to school age kids on Friday in Starkville.

 

Armstrong Middle School distributed meals to its students on Friday in Starkville. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Armstrong Middle School distributed meals to its students on Friday in Starkville. Some version of meal deliveries will be available to students while school is out of session until April 17 to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

 

Carlos Kemp hands lunches to students on Friday in Starkville. Kemp helped load the lunches at Armstrong Middle School before riding around with bus driver Rebecca Neely and physical education teacher Steve Denson. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Carlos Kemp hands lunches to students on Friday in Starkville. Kemp helped load the lunches at Armstrong Middle School before riding around with bus driver Rebecca Neely and physical education teacher Steve Denson.

 

Ricky Knight, park host at John C. Stennis Lock and Dam, places a new trash bag in the bin on Thursday near the entrance of the dam. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closed the park March 18 to help maintain the spread of COVID-19. The park will be closed until May 1, but fishers will be allowed to enter the park on foot. The restrooms at the boat ramp have also been closed. Visitors who use the pavilion near the boat ramp will do so at their own risk. Maintenance workers will not be sanitizing the property while it is closed. The day the park closed, Knight counted 118 cars turn around at the gate in only an hour and a half while he sat nearby working on a puzzle. / Photo by: Jennifer Mosbrucker/Special to The Dispatch

Ricky Knight, park host at John C. Stennis Lock and Dam, places a new trash bag in the bin on Thursday near the entrance of the dam. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers closed the park March 18 to help maintain the spread of COVID-19. The park will be closed until May 1, but fishers will be allowed to enter the park on foot. The restrooms at the boat ramp have also been closed. Visitors who use the pavilion near the boat ramp will do so at their own risk. Maintenance workers will not be sanitizing the property while it is closed. The day the park closed, Knight counted 118 cars turn around at the gate in only an hour and a half while he sat nearby working on a puzzle.

 

 

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