Photographers to record the 200th birthday of Mississippi

December 6, 2017 10:38:12 AM

  -

 

On Sunday, dozens of Mississippi photographers, both professional and amateur, will celebrate the state's 200th birthday and fan out to record the people and places that make the state a unique place to live and work. The project, inspired by the "Day in the Life" series of books in the 1980s and 90s, will leave behind a visual historical record of life in Mississippi for years to come. 

 

"Day in the Life: Mississippi 200" is the ambitious project by Scott Boyd, the editor and publisher of the Macon Beacon. Before coming to Macon, Boyd was a staff photographer at the (Jackson) Clarion Ledger in the 1980's and early 90s and studied photojournalism at the University of Southern Mississippi, graduating in 1981. "I'm looking forward to seeing what this talented group of photographers comes up with Sunday," said Boyd. "This will be a great opportunity to record history and give everyone a new view of our beautiful state and its wonderful people." 

 

Organizers are inviting all manner of photographers to participate. Everything from smartphones to digital cameras will be allowed. The only requirement is a desire to tell the story of Mississippi in photographs made on December 10. The goal is to capture what makes Mississippi great like our interesting personalities; the work ethic of the people; our ability to laugh and cry; our faith in the Almighty and our love of the land and water. Mississippi is called "The Hospitality State," "The Magnolia State" and "The Birthplace of American Music." It's known for catfish and cotton and it's the birthplace of Elvis and Oprah. There are so many themes that relate to Mississippi, it will be hard not to make a unique photo on Dec. 10. 

 

"Day in the Life: Mississippi 200" will use social media platforms Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as a way to share images made on that one particular day by using the hashtag #MS200. The group hopes to create a set of photographs that capture a glimpse of life in the Magnolia State.  

 

In the future, the photographs may be used for exhibits or a published book. The photographs may also be made available to university archives.