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Changes coming to college basketball

 

Photo by: The Dispatch File Photo

 

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The next step in the aftermath of the FBI's investigation into college basketball came Wednesday. 

 

After the NCAA created and heard recommendations from its Commission on College Basketball, the NCAA's Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors released the changes it will make. 

 

The biggest change is one that now allows undrafted players to return to school if they so choose. Previously, players had a specific date where they had to withdraw from the draft if they wanted to maintain their college eligibility; now, they can go all the way through the draft process and still return to school if they do not get selected. 

 

Of course, undrafted players also retain the freedom to entertain Summer League or international offers.  

 

Since all of this was caused by outside influences -- mostly apparel companies -- and their impact on players and programs, the NCAA addressed that, too. It said schools will now be required to report their athletics-related incomes from any source outside of the school, apparel companies included. It also said the NCAA is working with apparel companies on an agreement for, "expectations of accountability and transparency." 

 

The NCAA is also putting in rules to take the emphasis in recruiting away from AAU events and toward high school events. 

 

Also in recruiting, prospects will now have the freedom to make more official visits -- those paid for by the schools -- and will now have the freedom to hire an agent to help them make their decisions on going pro. Those agents must be certified by a NCAA program. 

 

On the enforcement side, the NCAA said those investigating NCAA cases can now accept information established by another administrative body, such as courts of law or government agencies. It also promised harsher penalties, such as longer postseason bans, longer coaching suspensions and harsher recruiting restrictions. 

 

Follow Dispatch sports writer Brett Hudson on Twitter @Brett_Hudson

 

 

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