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A real 'Night at the Museum'

 

Brett Addison looks up from the telescope to watch the International Space Station make its way across the sky in front of Hilbun Hall Feb. 15. Addison is a doctoral researcher in astronomy at MSU.

Brett Addison looks up from the telescope to watch the International Space Station make its way across the sky in front of Hilbun Hall Feb. 15. Addison is a doctoral researcher in astronomy at MSU. Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Launch Photo Gallery

 

Corbin Kirk, 7, holds

Corbin Kirk, 7, holds "The Ambassador," a 13-year-old tarantula visiting Hilbun Hall during Science Night at the Museum. "I was scared at first, but then I saw a 4-year-old do it," said Corbin, son of Ben and Nadine Kirk of Starkville.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Ryan Whitehouse from the Entomological Museum at MSU shows off a remarkable collection of creatures to visitors at Science Night at the Museum.

Ryan Whitehouse from the Entomological Museum at MSU shows off a remarkable collection of creatures to visitors at Science Night at the Museum.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Ella Horan, 9, takes a closer look at a mastodon jaw, with teeth still intact, at the Cobb Institute during Science Night at the Museum. The fossil was found in Lee County and has been dated to be about one million years old. Ella is the daughter of Joe and Sara Horan of Starkville.

Ella Horan, 9, takes a closer look at a mastodon jaw, with teeth still intact, at the Cobb Institute during Science Night at the Museum. The fossil was found in Lee County and has been dated to be about one million years old. Ella is the daughter of Joe and Sara Horan of Starkville.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Maddie Butler, 9, left, and her sister Sophie Butler, 10, check out a large depiction of what a central Tombigbee town in 1450 AD Mississippi might have looked like with their dad, Chad Butler, at the Cobb Institute of Archeology.

Maddie Butler, 9, left, and her sister Sophie Butler, 10, check out a large depiction of what a central Tombigbee town in 1450 AD Mississippi might have looked like with their dad, Chad Butler, at the Cobb Institute of Archeology.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Alexa Haney, 10, and her twin sister Hannah point to their favorite butterfly at Hilbun Hall.

Alexa Haney, 10, and her twin sister Hannah point to their favorite butterfly at Hilbun Hall. "But I liked looking at the tarantula best," Alexa said. The sisters' parents are Jeff and Christa Haney of Mathiston.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Riyaz Mathews, 10, is in awe as he watches a traveling electrical volt during Science Night at the Museum.

Riyaz Mathews, 10, is in awe as he watches a traveling electrical volt during Science Night at the Museum. "And I liked how they made a cloud with evaporated water in a bottle," Riyaz said. "They opened it up and it made a cloud — that was the coolest!" He is the son of Rahel Mathews and Dipangkar Dutta of Starkville.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Warren Kinard, 4, and older brother Felix Kinard, 5, are fascinated by Neanderthal skulls at Science Night at the Museum. The boys' parents are Damien and Sheryl Kinard of Starkville.

Warren Kinard, 4, and older brother Felix Kinard, 5, are fascinated by Neanderthal skulls at Science Night at the Museum. The boys' parents are Damien and Sheryl Kinard of Starkville.
Photo by: Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff

 

Wonjoe Cho, 13, makes sure his mother, Inkyoung Lee, doesn’t miss the International Space Station as it moved across the night sky during a 23-minute window at Science Night at the Museum Feb. 15.

 

 

Jan Swoope

 

 

Ancient bones, giant spiders, outer space and human skulls were all on tap for Science Night at the Museum on the Mississippi State campus Feb. 15.  

 

The family night filled with discovery let visitors from toddlers to retirees explore a host of "ologys" -- geology, paleontology, entomology, meteorology, anthropology and archaeology among them. Not to mention astronomy, physics, veterinary science, and a free movie, too. Presented by the MSU Museums and Galleries Committee, Science Night tours and hands-on activities in the Dunn-Seiler Geology Museum in Hilbun Hall and Cobb Institute of Archaeology shared the faculty's enthusiasm for science, research and revelations. 

 

"Our research ranges across the world and deals with some of the most interesting sites and artifacts, and our faculty are actively rewriting the history of the world as we know it, or have been taught it through the years," said Dylan Karges, with the Cobb Institute of Archaeology. 

 

Dunn-Seiler Museum Collections Manager Amy Moe-Hoffman added, "I absolutely love this event because I get to see kids and adults smiling from ear to ear, having a great time with science. People have already been asking about next year's event!"

 

Jan Swoope is the Lifestyles Editor for The Commercial Dispatch.

 

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